learners

Using assignments instead of final exams: a case for assessing learning in prisons

Using assignments instead of final exams: a case for assessing learning in prisons

The majority of my learners have learnt the relevant skills required for them to use the tools of a particular Office product, however, some are finding it difficult to pass exams due to: set time pressures, reminders of bad school experiences, and a reliance on good memory.  

From a teaching perspective, going assignment based would make my life easier as I would have more time to spend teaching learners rather than constantly marking exams or checking IPU’s not just for ICT content, but for grammar and spelling.

What are student perceptions of my marking and feedback practice of summative assessment?

What are student perceptions of my marking and feedback practice of summative assessment?

What are student perceptions of my marking and feedback practice of summative assessment? Are they only interested in the headline news – ‘did I pass?’ Or do they read and reflect in greater detail? If they have passed or achieved the merit or distinction they were hoping for, do they bother reading the rest of the annotations and feedback? In terms of development, do they prefer brief abbreviations or longer comments?

Questions that might arise include: Does my marking serve a deeper purpose for students beyond getting a grade? Do I need to find ways to encourage greater engagement of students with my marking? Will I need to make fundamental practice changes to do this?

The Impact of the Induction Process on Learners Starting College

I have chosen to research the impact of the induction process on learners starting college for my action project for a number of reasons. Primarily, because I believe that this is a key area for the college. It is the first impression for learners and currently sees a high dropout rate between application completion and course start date. Secondly, within my role I have scope to make necessary changes to this area. This will allow me to test my theories and ideas. I have seen the induction process change over the time I have worked at the college and it has already improved, but I feel that it still has further room for growth.

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How Can Educators Overcome The Barriers of Teaching Academic Subjects to Students Learning in English as a Second Language When Resources Are Scarce?

The main reason for choosing the importance of having varied resources is that it ultimately helps to stimulate the learning environment. If a teacher delivers the same style of lesson every day for twelve weeks at some point one will not be catering for all learning styles and the lack of variety may mean that some learners lose motivation and enthusiasm for the subject studied. It is the role of an educator to inspire learning but one can only fulfil this role if the right resources are used to suit the level and type of learners.

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Essentials of Enhancing International Students Learning through Strategic Planning and Guided Support.

Identifying learning needs for International students are very important during Induction week. This enables appointed tutors to identify the limitations and the opportunity for curriculum plan to make necessary amendments at the early stage. Thus, this action research project aim to discuss the importance of identifying learning needs of international Students to design and plan the curriculum at the early stages of their study during induction and early term.
Why International Students?
Teaching at many private colleges for the past 5 years as a management tutor, it was identified that international students took half of the year to settle down within their studies due to following reasons,
Changes in their physical environment.
Language barrier (speaking and creative writing)
 Changes in Learning methods and Practices (Functional Learning)

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Understanding The Cognitive Domain Of The Pashto Learners

According to the Foreign Services Institute (FSI), Pashto language is linguistically and culturally considered significantly different from English and is placed in category four with regards to its level of difficulty for an English speaker (FSI, 2011). It requires eleven hundred class hours or forty-four weeks to reach to a General Professional Proficiency level 3 in speaking (S3) and reading (R3) (FSI, 2011). For an English speaker, Pashto can be very difficult to learn because of a variety of reasons. These problems may include grammatical structure, limited vowels, strange alphabets, Arabic writing script, drastic cultural differences, etc. To address this issue, one need to understand what are the real difficulties/problems for an English speaker to learn Pashto language? An exploratory approach is needed to find out the most salient problems involved in Pashto learning.

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Face To Face Teaching Vs. E-Learning - Which is More Appropriate For Entry Level 3 Literacy Learners?

This main purpose of this action research is not to compare online and traditional face-to-face teaching but merely to prove which one is more suitable for learners with very low literacy skills. At this present moment there is a huge demand for tutors in the lifelong learning sector to incorporate e-learning into their teaching and learning so that learners are equipped with ICT skills with a view that this will enable them to participate effectively in modern society. However, because many of the learners I teach are mature learners who are used to being taught traditionally, have never used a computer before and some do not have English as their first language, they are left struggling with their course.

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The Kinetic Lesson: An Approach for Disengaged Students

My notes revealed that many students used distraction techniques to avoid work. It became apparent that most students found it difficult to listen effectively to instructions; teachers and teaching assistants would need to repeat those individually. The class had, by March, started controlling the lessons by becoming louder and by denying their abilities.
To develop a strategy for the research, I considered what exactly I would be researching. I wished to understand whether a kinetic lesson (active lesson) would assist the students to learn. Two bottom-set groups will be taught the topic of ‘rounding’ in an active way. In order to measure the learning, I will assess their ability before and after the active lesson, as well as how much they pick up during the activity.

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An Investigation Into “How Might We Improve Our Monitoring Of Teaching and Learning At School?”

In March 2006, a report by the Teaching & Learning Research Programme recognised that ‘teaching and learning are what ultimately make a difference in the mind of the learner’. They also stated that the role of any education policy was to provide guidance, resources and accountability in order to support high quality teaching and learning.
This report combined with Ofsted’s report Twenty outstanding primary schools – Excelling against the odds (2009) sparked my interest in investigating the monitoring of teaching and learning within school. My own research project during 2012 and 2013 has, to date, revealed that there are numerous ways of monitoring teaching and learning. Most notably these include: consistent careful planning, self-evaluation, observation, close liaison with the Learning Advisor and consulting pupils.

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Is Online Education As Effective As Traditional Teaching?

In my teaching practice, we offer two kinds of teaching, one is traditional teaching and the other is online learning. Traditional teaching is teaching learners in the classroom on set days and times using a range of teaching methods. Traditional teaching allows the learner to get one to one help from their teacher. Online learning is accessed on a computer through a username and password. All the resources are posted online for the learner to access. This type of learning is accessed whenever the learner wants to learn and can be learnt at their own pace. However the online learning does not answer questions the learners may have like the traditional teaching.

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Is Education in Prisons Fit for Purpose?

This is an important issue for me as the employability tutor as my main role is to ensure that the learners can and do create a action plan for their release in terms of education, further training and gaining employment.
For this I have to assist the learner to build up a picture of what skills and education they had prior to coming in to prison and what the offenders have gained within prison to develop themselves further with a view to increase their changes of gaining employment and them match this to what they will be doing once released.

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Incorporating Games Into The Classroom

As someone entering teaching for the first time I found working at a community college to be extremely challenging. My learners had been mandated to attend college from the job centre under threat of sanction of having their benefits stopped. Their attitude was very much ready for “flight or fight” in their first days. The “New Deal” course was a roll on, roll off course and so there was no definite start and end date but a continuous stream of disgruntled learners each week to disrupt the make-up of the existing class.
It became quickly apparent that I needed to engage the learners very quickly to avoid problems. Whilst it would be nice to say that I wanted them to become motivated learners it had more to do with classroom management. Often the learners did not want to learn but simply wanted to pass their time.

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Pashto Language: Solving the Mysteries of the Past Tense

Unlike English, Pashto is an ergative language. Because of the absence of any English language structures similar to ergativity, ergativity presents a significant obstacle for English speakers as they gain skill in speaking Pashto. As Pashtu language has a split feature of ergativity, it clearly appears in Pashto when someone learns the past tense. Also, to English speakers, an ergative construction may appear to be an exotic feature of Pashto. However, according to Trask (1996), hundreds of ergative languages have been described by modern linguistics. According to other sources, one in four languages spoken in the world show ergative features.

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Evaluation of Relationship Between Teacher and Learner

At the start of the planning meeting for this year, the organisation had decided to make changes. Instead of assigning tutors a class for the whole year, the unit manager had decided to recognise areas of expertise and assign tutor’s areas of curriculum rather than one singular class. For me, this meant that I would be delivering the safeguarding unit of every level 2 and 3 qualification for classroom assistants across the year. 6 classes in total. In theory, this seemed like an excellent plan, the learners would be getting the best of every tutors area of knowledge meaning that the value of each qualification gained was of greater value. In practice, it has not quite worked.

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Stretching and Challenging Learners

I am going to research how to stretch and challenge my students during their lessons. The phrase “stretch and challenge” can relate to the whole class, and be included within the lesson to the whole class, but equally it can be interpreted to mean pushing the most able students to think beyond what has been taught, perhaps focusing on the implications of what they have learned or evaluating the effectiveness of a particular model or method. I am interpreting “stretch and challenge” to mean the stretching of all the students within a class to suit their ability level. I want all my students to feel challenged in the lesson and to overcome these challenges. What is a challenge to one student will be different to another student and I would like to adapt my teaching methods to reflect this.

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What Motivates Learners to Join and Attend Adult Numeracy Classes?

Motivation is what teachers, tutors or educators think of as the distinguishing feature of adult learners from school pupils. Based on their more mature behaviour due to age and past experiences, what we tend to assume is that adult learners come into the classroom with ‘bags of motivation’ and are ready to absorb what we teach. We prepare the resources aiming them to be engaging, interactive and interesting; deliver the lessons using innovative and inclusive approaches, yet we still observe that a couple of learners may have a chat here and there with another friend in the classroom or seem to be disengaged, more so in the subject of numeracy than ESOL, both of which I teach.

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Issues of Retention in the First Four Weeks of Induction

The purpose of this research was to establish the benefits of changing the student induction process to increase retention on childcare courses during the first four weeks of the course.
The main difficulty was retaining students, in the first few weeks of a course; it seemed we were incapable of maintaining punctuality and motivating students to remain on their enrolled programme of choice. I t was this situation and the consequences of poor retention figures that provoked me to investigate why this was happening.

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Managing Challenging Behaviour

For the organisation I work for, learners with challenging behaviour are more and more frequently being enrolled at the college, each learner is individually funded by the Local Education Authority with support ranging from £22,000 to £110,000 per year. Due to the funding allocated to individual learners, teachers have increasing pressures to meet targets such as learners completing their courses and passing. Subsequently, classroom behaviour management is a key element that needs to be successful to secure funding by meeting the targets set by the Local Education Authority in return for the enrolment of more learners with challenging behaviour thus more funding for the college. Therefore, identifying a workable and manageable behaviour strategy and policy that can be used consistently in the classroom and across the college is ever more important to get right in order to meet such targets.

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Dealing With Special Educational Needs - Should We Include in Mainstream Education?

The research that I would like to look at is how a teacher how you deal with it on a daily basis so as not to create a negative effect to the child and to other students in the class, and to also assist all of the class to understand some of their classmates ways. Sometimes students with SEN can be excluded from every day classes and some teachers feel as though they should be taught separately – my research is all about integration and how they students with SEN has every right to be within the classroom and taught exactly the same way as the student without SEN. I am actually proposing that ALL students with SEN/EBD be taught in a mainstream class with all of the other students.

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